Ohio Wildlife Center Success Stories

The following success stories were shared by Ohio Wildlife Center in Powell, Ohio.

great blue heron being fed
Great Blue Heron Recovers From Dog Attack

Great Blue Heron Recovers From Dog Attack
A great blue heron was admitted to our hospital due to a dog attack in August of 2018. Upon entry, the adult heron had an underweight body condition, weighed 1.55 kilograms (3.41 pounds) and could not stand. Ohio Wildlife Center used Emeraid Intensive Care Piscivore via tube feeding to stabilize the heron while it was in care at the hospital. Within 48 hours the bird began standing and eating on its own. Care continued at the pre-release facility where it fully healed and returned to a good, overall healthy body condition. It was released after 20 days of care, having regained all flight ability.

 

 

 

 

crow being fed
American Crow Battles Back After Being Grounded

American Crow Battles Back After Being Grounded
In May of 2018 a resident of Columbus, Ohio was alerted by his dog to presence of a juvenile crow sitting in the yard. He observed the crow sitting in the same location for several days before deciding to act. Upon entry, the juvenile American crow weighed 248 grams (about half a pound) and appeared to have a recently healed fracture that had preventing it from self-feeding appropriately. It was tube fed a 50/50 blend of Emeraid Intensive Care Omnivore and Emeraid Intensive Care Carnivore as a supplement to its diet as it transitioned back to eating on its own. The crow grew to be a healthy, active adult and was released in October of 2018.

 

 

 

 

 

voles in tank
Orphaned Voles Get Help

Orphaned Voles Get Help
These voles were admitted in October of 2018, after being found scattered in a yard. The entry weight for these little infants was around 3.2 grams (.11 ounces) each. They also had a declined body condition and appeared to be orphans. Ohio Wildlife Center used Emeraid Intensive Care Herbivore for the voles since they have a very particular diet. A lapping crock was used for them to self-feed as they were very skittish. The supplement is extremely useful in allowing them to gain weight quickly and aligns with their natural diet. They continued to flourish and were released in December of 2018.

 

 

Baby Southern Flying Squirrel Discovered By Cat
A southern flying squirrel was admitted to our hospital in early September of 2018. The person who brought it in discovered the squirrel in the mouth of their cat. Upon entry, the eyes-closed infant southern flying squirrel weighed 22 grams (0.78 oz). Ohio Wildlife Center uses Emeraid Intensive Care Omnivore to assist in weaning their infant rodents, including this flying squirrel. The photo shows the supplement in a tiny crock where the animal can lap the food on its own while being weaned off formula.

After two months of care, the now active juvenile weighed 67 grams (2.4 ounces). Fully weaned and self-feeding, he was transferred to another rehabber to co-mingle with other young flying squirrels in preparation for release in Spring of 2019.