A Duck, Greater Scaup, And Beaver Enjoy Rehabilitation Success

long-tailed duck sitting on towels These stories were shared by Hope For Wildlife in Seaforth, Nova Scotia, Canada.

This male long-tailed duck was one of the first patients admitted to Hope for Wildlife in 2018. He is also the first time staff has seen a male of this species in full breeding plumage with the signature long tail. Suffering head trauma from an undetermined cause and severe emaciation, he was tube-fed EmerAid Intensive Care Omnivore until he became alert enough to self-feed in a seabird tub. He was released to the wild in early spring 2018.

greater scaup sittingThis greater scaup is the first of its kind admitted to Hope for Wildlife. He arrived mid-December 2017 with neurological trauma. Unable to self-feed, the staff tube-fed EmerAid Intensive Care Omnivore three times per day until the patient was strong enough to self-feed during daily swims in a seabird tub. He was released to the wild in January 2018.

beaver holding twigThis female beaver was admitted to Hope for Wildlife as an orphaned baby found in the summer of 2016. She has developed a bond with another young beaver who came in very soon after. In the winter of 2017, she received wounds to the base of her tail after she escaped her storm-damaged enclosure. To help her eat her medication, it was mixed with apples and EmerAid Intensive Care Herbivore. She continued rehabilitation at Hope for Wildlife until release in May 2018.